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Reasons why car accidents are more likely near home

On Behalf of | Apr 12, 2021 | blog, Car Accidents |

A recent study has revealed that over 50% of car crashes happen close to a driver’s home. As a New Jersey resident, this statistic can be scary, to say the least. Understanding why these accidents are more likely to happen can help you to better mitigate the risk of being involved in an accident close to your phone.

Drunk driving

Many car accidents that happen within close vicinity to a driver’s home are a result of drunk driving. People are more likely to have a higher alcohol consumption level when they’re near where they live. They falsely believed that the close distance to the residence will help to reduce their risk of being involved in an accident. Unfortunately, the statistics show that that’s not correct. It’s always advisable to ensure that you have a designated driver picked out before you start drinking.

A lack of vigilance

Due to the number of times that you’re driving on the roadways closest to your home, you tend to feel more comfortable driving on them. This can cause any driver to become less vigilant when they’re driving in these areas just because they’re so familiar with them. When a driver’s vigilance level goes down, the likelihood that a vehicle accident may occur goes up. Simply being distracted by texting or even having a phone conversation while you’re driving can reduce your alertness level and potentially lead to an accident.

While most of us don’t give a second thought to be involved in an accident unless we’re going on a long road trip, the reality is that most accidents happen very close to where we live. Becoming more familiar with these areas allows us to let our guard down and can lead to vehicular accidents. It’s always a good idea to ensure that you pay attention while you’re driving regardless of where you’re driving at and that you always get a designated driver if you plan on drinking.

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