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Study: quarter of car crashes occur in the first few minutes

| Nov 12, 2020 | Car Accidents |

Dolphin Technologies has a study showing how car accidents tend to happen not long after drivers have headed out. Drivers in New Jersey may be alarmed to hear this, but the first 10 minutes of a car trip in particular can be dangerous.

What the Dolphin study involved

Dolphin is an Austrian provider of telematics systems that can be installed in vehicles. The study was able to utilize the data that these devices collected between the years 2018 and 2019. The anonymized data encompassed 3.2 million trips made by 40,000 vehicle owners. Of these trips, 1,986 resulted in accidents.

25% of crashes in the first three minutes

Around a quarter of these accidents arose in the first three minutes while an additional 14% took place between three and six minutes after the trip began. Short trips, though, are not alone in the dangers they pose. Drivers who take a trip longer than 40 minutes are 2.5 times likelier to crash than drivers whose trips are between 10 and 20 minutes. Relatively speaking, the safest length for a car trip is 10 to 20 minutes.

It should be noted that 87% of the car trips that ended in a crash were less than 30 minutes. Only 1% exceeded an hour, so the risk levels may have differed if there were additional data.

What drivers can do to stay safe

Researchers emphasize not taking the car for trips shorter than 10 minutes. Walking and taking the bicycle are always good alternatives. They say that on longer trips, one should regularly stop for breaks. Of course, drivers should, regardless of the length of the trip, avoid all distractions. These account for 26% of all crashes.

Finding out if you can file a claim

Usually, a driver’s losses after an MVA can be covered by PIP benefits. Injuries that reach a “serious injury” threshold, though, can provide the basis for a third-party insurance claim. If this could be the route you’re going to take, it may be wise to consult a lawyer. Legal representation may prove helpful during negotiations.