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Who can I sue for injuries resulting from a pothole crash?

| Aug 21, 2020 | Motorcycle Accidents |

Injuries resulting from accidents involving potholes typically require immediate medical attention. You may seek compensation from the local government agency responsible for the road’s maintenance and upkeep. 

To hold a local government liable for causing damage, however, you need to show that it knew of the existence of a potentially dangerous pothole. 

How could I prove knowledge of existing potholes?

Local county boards generally provide town hall meetings that residents can attend. A board member or secretary may post online records of the discussions conducted during the meetings. Those records could show if local residents previously discussed road conditions and potholes. 

The public has access to a local government’s records of road surveys and its plans for improvements. You may request to see prior records of surveys and work performed on the street where you experienced a crash. If local government knew of a pothole and failed to fix it, you may have grounds to seek a remedy for your injuries. 

How much of my medical expenses could I recover?

A Garden State jury may decide to award you compensation based on the amount of your medical bills, rehabilitation and physical therapy. If you cannot return to work, you may also receive damages for lost income. 

A New Jersey resident sued the County of Passaic over several gaping potholes that caused him to lose control of his motorcycle and crash. As reported by RideApart.com, records of residents complaining of potholes dated back to 2014. 

The records demonstrated to the court that the county knew of a problem involving potholes, but failed to properly maintain the road. The results of its negligence caused the accident that left a motorcyclist with devastating injuries. Because he cannot return to work, the jury awarded damages of more than $2.5 million.