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How much can you get for a totaled car?

| Aug 10, 2020 | Car Accidents |

As you recover from injuries sustained in a recent car wreck, you might receive news that your insurance company has decided your car has received so much damage that it is not worth repairing. In this situation, the insurer has deemed your car a “total loss.” Now the question is how much your insurer will offer to cover your vehicle. 

Even with a totaled car, there is plenty of room to work out a settlement with your insurer. U.S. News and World Report explains that you do not have to accept a first offer and may exercise other options to get a fair price. 

Negotiating with your insurer

If you feel your car is worth more than your insurance company is willing to pay for it, you can negotiate with your insurer to raise the price. In doing so, you should offer evidence supporting a higher value for your vehicle. Consider checking out how much cars like yours sell for in the current market to come up with a price. 

Showing your service records

Producing service records for your vehicle may also help your insurer understand the true value of your car. You might have brought your car into a body shop to have new brakes or tires installed. Major repair or replacement jobs can add to the value of your car. Try to use recent records if possible. 

Check insurer information

Sometimes insurance companies do not use the right information when determining a value for your automobile. Be sure that your insurer listed the right model for your vehicle along with all the options your automobile possesses. If you spot errors, you should let the insurer know. Your insurer may offer you a higher estimate after a quick clarification. 

Have the car repaired yourself

Bear in mind that you could choose to repair your car even if your insurer does not think it is worth the effort to fix. You may release your insurer from its obligation and seek out someone to repair the vehicle yourself. As an alternative, you might decide to sell the car for parts if you feel your insurer will not offer a good value for them.