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Could the answer to texting while driving lie in new technology?

"The cure is in the hair of the dog that bit you." It's an old wive's tale that says a sip of alcohol the following morning is the perfect cure for the hangover that ails you, but it can apply to many other situations — like texting while driving.

If technology created texting-while-driving, which has caused fatal accidents throughout the United States, perhaps we can turn to technology for the cure. Perhaps, if computer scientists put their minds to it, they could create special apps and in-vehicle tech that render motorists unable to operate their smartphones while behind the wheel.

Could cellphone blocking technology be the answer we're looking for?

In fact, the technology described above already exists. All we have to do is implement it. Cellphone blocking applications assist drivers in staying focused behind the wheel. These devices temporarily turn smartphones into useless bricks, so drivers can't use them while operating their cars. The most basic of these technologies — which include applications and other tech available from cellphone services — make it impossible to text and talk while a car is moving.

The more sophisticated versions extending beyond blocking. They check for speeding and sudden stops while blocking audio features. These apps can also provide information and vital insight to parents and police, who may want to evaluate how closely a driver was following the rules of the road.

Who's using anti-texting-while-driving technology?

At this stage, mostly parents and employers are using the technology to track teen drivers and workers. However, it's possible that lawmakers, police and the judiciary could use this technology in the future. Perhaps a criminal court convicts a driver of texting-while-driving. Just like judges mandate an ignition interlock device to prevent convicted drunk drivers from engaging in the activity again, anti-texting-while-driving applications could be required for convicted text offenders.

Were you or a family member hurt by a ''text offender?''

If someone hurt you in a car accident and the at-fault driver wasn't paying attention to the road, you might want to investigate whether smartphone use was to blame. In some cases, plaintiffs in car accident injury cases can demand cellphone records from the at-fault drivers to prove that the motorists were distracted by smartphones.

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